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  • Wear Out – Phrasal Verb of the Day

    Today’s phrasal verb of the day is: Wear Out

    Infinitive form: Wear Out

    Present Tense: Wear Out/ Wears Out

    ing form: Wearing Out

    Past tense: Wore Out

    Past Participle: Worn Out

     

    Wear Out is a separable English phrasal verb. It can be used in two different ways:

     

    When something is damaged or weaken from use and age and is therefore rendered close to being useless

    1. The carpet looks worn out, and it smells bad, so can we please replace it?

    2. Whoa! Go easy on the brakes, will you? You will wear the brake pads out faster than you can imagine if this continues.

     

    When something or someone makes you very tired

    1. Hayden’s wife’s demands wore him out, that’s why he left.

    2. Please stop nagging unless your goal is to wear me out.

     

    <iframe width=”420″ height=”315″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/r7hCnyebNZI?rel=0″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

     

    Exercises: Write your answers in comments and we will correct them.

    Fill in the gaps from the video above:

    “Billy: I might ____ you ____ before then.”

    “Dean: Oh don’t you worry about ____ me ____. I’m going to ___ you ___.”

    How does being worn out feel like to you? What was happening during that time when you felt pretty worn out?

     

    Complete the sentences below with the correct form of Wear Out.

    1. The detective finally ___ the suspect ___ by his perseverance in asking questions over and over again.

    2. His clothes might look ____ ____, but don’t be deceived, for he’s a very wealthy man under a disguise.

    3. Am I ______ you _____ yet?

    4. Wow! You look ____ ____. When was the last time you had sleep?

    5. If I take this route everyday, my shoes will be _____ ____ by the end of the month.

     

    Change the example sentences above to negative sentences (or positive, if the sentence is already negative). Then change them to questions.