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  • Three Word Phrasal Verbs

    Ugh! I know MORE phrasal verbs. But they are so important! I recently read that a native English speaker uses 30 phrasal verbs in 5 minutes of speaking. So like it or not, if you want to understand us, you’ve got to learn phrasal verbs.

    This week we are looking at 3 word phrasal verbs. For example: feel up to, get over with, get along with, put up with, screw out of, talk down to, look forward to. You can see from the list that there is a verb + an adverb + a preposition. Watch the video to find out more about the 3 word phrasal verbs and the rules:

    Complete the sentence with the correct phrasal verb in the correct tense from the list above. Write your answer in comments and we will respond.

    1. I couldn’t ___ __ ___ her complaining anymore. I finally just blew up and yelled at her.

    2. I’m really _____ ____ __ meeting my new Yoga teacher. I’ve heard great things about her.

    3. I was so sick over Thanksgiving that I didn’t ___ __ __ eating any turkey.

    4. I’m really stressed out about the interview. I can’t wait to ___ it ___ ____.

    5. Do you ___ ____ ____ your in-laws?

    6. Even if you think the rules are unfair you have to ____ ___ ____ them.

     

     

    • An

      1. I couldn’t feel up to her complaining anymore. I finally just blew up and yelled at her.
      2. I’m really looking foward to meeting my new Yoga teacher. I’ve heard great things about her.
      3. I was so sick over Thanksgiving that I didn’t __? __ __ eating any turkey.
      4. I’m really stressed out about the interview. I can’t wait to get it over with.
      5. Do you get along (get on) with your in-laws?
      6. Even if you think the rules are unfair you have to put up with them.

      • LOIEnglish

        An…Good work.

        Question #1: put up with (can’t stand, can’t endure)
        Question #3: feel up to

    • LOIEnglish

      PH Rodrigues…phrasal verbs are always challenging. In December we will have a phrasal verb coming out daily. But here is a quick translation

      put up with-agüentar

      look forward to-ansiosos para

      feel up to-sentia ate

      get it over with-acabar com isso

      get along with-dar-se bem com

    • Rafa

      1. I couldn’t GET ALONG WITH her complaining anymore. I finally just blew up and yelled at her.

      2. I’m really LOOKING FORWARD TO meeting my new Yoga teacher. I’ve heard great things about her.

      3. I was so sick over Thanksgiving that I didn’t LOOK FORWARD TO eating any turkey.

      4. I’m really stressed out about the interview. I can’t wait to GET it OVER WITH.

      5. Do you GET ALONG WITH your in-laws?

      6. Even if you think the rules are unfair you have to GET ALONG WITH them.

      • LOIEnglish

        Rafa thanks for answering. You had some difficulties with Question #1, 3, and 6.

    • PH Rodrigues

      Thanks a lot. So… let me try:

      1. I couldn’t PUT UP WITH her complaining anymore. I finally just blew up and yelled at her.
      2. I’m really LOOKING FORWARD TO meeting my new Yoga teacher. I’ve heard great things about her.
      3. I was so sick over Thanksgiving that I didn’t FEEL UP TO eating any turkey.
      4. I’m really stressed out about the interview. I can’t wait to GET it OVER WITH.
      5. Do you GET ALONG WITH your in-laws?
      6. Even if you think the rules are unfair you have to PUT UP WITH them.

      • LOIEnglish

        Nice work!

    • Ilka

      1)put ut to
      2)looking forward to
      3) feel up to
      4) get it over with
      5)get along with
      6) put up with

      • LOIEnglish

        Ilka…Thanks for answering.

        Question #1: put up with
        Good work!

    • luca lattarini

      Hi, below I answered to list that you put forward me, but first of all i’d like to ask you a question.

      Has the phrasal verbs ( get it over with) a meaning equals to overcome?

      1-put up with
      2-look forward to
      3-feel up

      4-get it over with
      5-get along with
      6-put up with

      bye

      • LOIEnglish

        Good work Luca. Question #3: Also needs ‘to’ feel up to. The answer your question is, it is similar but could not be used in the same sentence. The definition for ‘get something over with’ is to complete an unpleasant task.

        I need to get my dentist appointment over with. (to complete or finish an unpleasant task, in this case; dentist appointment)

        We need the power to overcome poverty and racial divisions in our country. (to succeed in dealing with a grand problem)

    • Binh

      1. put up with
      2. look forward to
      3.go in for

      4.
      5. get on with
      6.