fbpx
  • Either, Neither or Too? Video and Exercise

    Many students in our English classes have difficulty knowing when to use either, neither or too when they want to agree or disagree with something. The words have similar meanings, but very specific uses.

    For example, if your friend says, “I don’t like sushi,” if you want to agree with this statement do you say, “Me neither,” Me either,” or “Me too?”

    Watch the video below to learn more about using either, neither and too, and then see if you can complete the exercises.


    Choose the correct answer below. Write your answers in comments and we will respond.

    1. Kevin: “Do you want tea or coffee?”  Freddy: “_____ I will have water.”

    a. Me too

    b. Either

    c. Neither

    d. I don’t too

    2. Kevin: “Do you want to go to a movie, or stay home?” Freddy: “I don’t care, _____ sounds nice to me.”

    a. neither one

    b. either one

    c. me too

    3. Kevin: “I don’t like oysters.” Freddy: ” _____, they are disgusting.”

    a. Me too

    b. Me either

    c. Me neither

    d. I don’t too

    4. Kevin: “She loves New York City.” Freddy: ” _____, it’s a beautiful city.”

    a. Me too

    b. Me either

    c. Me neither

    d. I don’t too

    5. Kevin: “Will you move to the United States or stay in Brazil?” Freddy: “____ one is possible for me.”

    a. Me too

    b. Either

    c. Neither

    d. I don’t to

    Ok, thanks! Contact us if you have questions.

    • William

      The answers are: c, b, c, a, b.

      • LOIEnglish

        Very good William. You got them all correct!

    • Bahruz

      Hello!
      c,b,a,a,b

      • LOIEnglish

        Almost Bahruz! You missed the third one. Can you see what the correct answer should be?

    • Adolfo

      4. Kevin: ”She loves New York City.” Freddy: ” _____, it’s a beautiful city.”
      a. Me too
      b. Me either
      Could letter “b” be possible?

      • LOIEnglish

        Adolfo…We use ‘me too’ to agree with positive sentences. 
        For example: 
        Person A. “I like ice-cream.”
        Person B.  “Me too.”

        We use ‘me neither’ to agree with negative sentences.  
        For Example: 
        Person A. “I don’t like traffic.”
        Person B. “Me neither.”

        *Note* We use “me NEITHER”   “me either” is incorrect. Many native speakers make this mistake but technically it is incorrect. We use ‘Either’ when ‘not’ is in the sentence. 
        For example: 
        I don’t like traffic. 
        I don’t either. 
        Notice that  not + either=neither. 

        • Adolfo

          So, “Me either” doesn’t exist, right? Even in positive sentences?