Break Up

Break Up

Infinitive: Break Up
Present Tense: Break Up/ Breaks Up
-ing Form: Breaking Up
Past Tense: Broke Up
Past Participle: Broken Up
It is a separable phrasal verb that can
be used in four ways
  1. 1

    To stop a fight.

    The police broke up the bar fight.
    The boxing referee kept breaking up the boxers whenever they attempted to hold one another.

  2. 2

    To separate into smaller pieces.

    Can you break up the ice into smaller pieces?
    The lumber jack broke up the wood.

  3. 3

    When the reception becomes inaudible because of technical interference.

    The radio started to break up when we entered the tunnel.
    The call kept breaking up, so we couldn't finish our conversation.

  4. 4

    To stop or end a romantic relationship with another person.
    [Noun] {Breakup} Refers to the end of a romantic relationship.

    Janice broke up with Brad over the weekend.
    It was a mutual breakup.

Break Up
  1. Martha ______ ____ with her boyfriend because he was moving too fast.
  2. Nobody ______ ____ the fight between the two women.
  3. Long distance calls tend to _______ ____ every once in a while.
  4. Did you see the movie The _____________?
  5. After you ______ ____ the crab, put the legs in the boiling water.

Listen for the phrasal verb Break Up in the video clip from the movie Blades of Glory

  1. [Scene 1]
    Manager: Jimmy MacElroy? Another great walking through the halls of the Grublets. Welcome to my little production. If you're here to thank me for firing Chazz Michaels, it was my pleasure.
    Jimmy: Chazz was here?

    Manager: Yeah, unfortunately, but it's fantastic that you're here. And yes, no need to ask, I'll consider you for a position.
    Jimmy: I'm not looking for a job. I'm actually looking for a female skater to compete with me at Nationals.

    Manager: Are you trying to skater poach?
    Jimmy: No.
    Manager: You trying to _______ ___ my family? Why don't you get out of here before I throw down?

    [Scene 2]
    Fairchild: We want you to turn your attention to Chazz now.

    Katie: What?

    Fairchild: MacElroy's heart is like a beautiful apple that's in your hand and now you need to bite it. Nothing ______ ___ a team faster than...

    Stranz: Herpes... Jealousy.

    [Scene 3]
    Sex Class Counselor: Why don't you go ahead and introduce yourself?
    Chazz: I know her.
    Katie: I'm Katie.

    Sex Class Counselor: And...?
    Katie: Oh, and I'm a sex addict.

    Chazz: Hey, Katie. Wow, so, you're a sex addict, too.
    Katie: Sex, sex, sex. What can I say?

    Chazz: Right. Right. I mean, you said it all. It's such a burden. I mean, people don't realise what we go through on a day-to-day basis.
    Katie: Why don't you come to my room tonight and we can comfort each other? 11:55 sharp.

    Sex Class Counselor: Come on, people, _____ it ___!
  2. How was the phrasal verb used in all three scenes?

    Differentiate the meaning of its usage in all three scenes.

Change the sentences above into questions, then change them into negatives.

  • Martha broke up with her boyfriend because he was moving too fast.
    Nobody breaks/broke up the fight between the two women.
    Long distance calls tend to break up every once in a while.
    Did you see the movie The breakup?
    After you break up the crab, put the legs in the boiling water.

  • Rafael Ferreira

    Martha broke up with her boyfriend because he was moving too fast.
    Nobody broke up the fight between the two women.
    Long distance calls tend to break up every once in a while.
    Did you see the movie The breakup?
    After you break up the crab, put the legs in the boiling water.

  • Viacheslav Levashov

    Martha broke up with her boyfriend because he was moving too fast.
    Nobody breaks up the fight between the two women.
    Long distance calls tend to break up every once in a while.
    Did you see the movie The breakup?
    After you break up the crab, put the legs in the boiling water.

  • LOIEnglish

    Good!

  • Yuri Manzhos

    There is a mistake in script for the first Scene 1 in the first line. Manager says “great welcome to…. ” not “great walking through”.

  • LOIEnglish

    Yuri….listen again. He says: Another ‘GREAT’ walking through the halls of My Little Grublets. Welcome to my little productions. He is speaking pretty fast but we sometimes use ‘GREAT’ as a noun to talk about certain people. For example: The greats of baseball were Robinson and Ruth.

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